Mollies

The Dalmation Molly

Dalmation MollyThe Dalmatian Molly is a hybrid color variation of Poecilia latipinna, the Sailfin Molly. The Sailfin Molly, P. latipinna, can be distinguished from the Mexican Sailfin, P. velifera by the number of dorsal rays. The Mexican Salfin has 18-19, and the Sailfin Molly has 14. The Dalmatian Molly has a black and white body, and is sometimes referred to as the Marbled Molly or Marbled Sailfin Molly.

Mollies have the ability to adapt to a variety of salt levels in the aquarium. With a gradual acclimation, this fish may be maintained in either a freshwater aquarium or a saltwater aquarium. In the freshwater aquarium, a teaspoon of aquarium salt per gallon is recommended for optimum health. The Dalmatian Molly requires a tank of at least 30-gallons densely planted with plenty of strong plants such as Java fern, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, and Anubias. It requires a good filtration system because of its hearty appetite and resulting waste products. The Dalmatian Molly is well suited for the community tank because of its peaceful nature, and is compatible with other peaceful, large fish that can withstand hard water. It may pursue its young and the young of other fish.

The pointed anal fin and much larger dorsal fin on the male, and the rounded anal fin and pregnancy spot on the female differentiate the two. The Dalmatian Molly is a livebearer that requires a spawning box in a 25 gallon, or larger, breeding tank. The aquarium should be planted as densely as possible or have a thick algae mat. Having a group of floating plants in the corner of the aquarium will promote rearing outside of the breeding tank. Every 60-70 days the female will give birth to 10-60 young that are already approximately 1/2 inch long.

The Dalmatian Molly is omnivorous and requires algae. Provide this fish with an algae based flake food, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp.

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The Lyretail Molly

Lyretail MollyThe Lyretail Molly is a hybrid variation of Poecilia latipinna, the Sailfin Molly. The Sailfin Molly, P. latipinna, can be distinguished from the Mexican Sailfin, P. velifera by the number of dorsal rays. The Mexican Salfin has 18-19, and the Sailfin Molly has 14. The Lyretail Molly is black with white highlights on its fins, and has a somewhat lyre-shaped caudal fin.

Mollies have the ability to adapt to a variety of salt levels in the aquarium. With a gradual acclimation, this fish may be maintained in either a freshwater or saltwater aquarium. In the freshwater aquarium, a teaspoon of aquarium salt per gallon is recommended for optimum health. The Lyretail Molly requires a tank of at least 30 gallons with plenty of strong plants such as Java fern, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, and Anubias. It requires a good filtration system because of its hearty appetite and resulting waste products. The Lyretail Molly is well suited for the community tank because of its peaceful nature, and is compatible with other peaceful, large fish that can withstand similar water conditions.

The pointed anal fin and much larger dorsal fin on the male, and the rounded anal fin and pregnancy spot on the female differentiate the two. The Lyretail Molly is a livebearer that requires a spawning box in a 25 gallon, or larger, breeding tank. The aquarium should be planted as densely as possible or have a thick algae mat. Having a group of floating plants in the corner of the aquarium will promote rearing outside of the breeding tank. Every 60-70 days the female will give birth to 10-60 young that are already approximately one-half inch long.

The Lyretail Molly is omnivorous and requires both meaty foods as well as algae. Provide this fish with an algae-based flake food, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp.

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The Mexican Sailfin Molly

Sailfin MollyThe Mexican Sailfin Molly is also known as the Giant Sailfin or Yucatan Molly. There are several color variations including black and platinum. The Mexican Sailfin, P. velifera, can be distinguished from the Sailfin Molly, P. latipinna by the number of dorsal rays. The Mexican Salfin has 18-19, and the Sailfin Molly has 14.

The Mexican Sailfin Molly is a peaceful fish and prefers hard water. Mollies have the ability to adapt to a variety of salt levels in the aquarium. With a gradual acclimation, this fish may be maintained in either a freshwater or saltwater aquarium. In the freshwater aquarium, a minimum of a teaspoon of aquarium salt per gallon is recommended for optimum health. The Mexican Sailfin Molly requires a tank of at least 40 gallons with algae and plenty of room to swim. The tall dorsal fin of the male will not develop if adequate room for him to swim is not provided. This species should only share a tank with other peaceful fish that prefer hard water with elevated salt levels.

The pointed anal fin and much larger dorsal fin on the male, and the rounded anal fin and pregnancy spot on the female differentiate the two. The Mexican Sailfin Molly is a livebearer that requires a spawning box in a 25 gallon, or larger, breeding tank. It should be planted as densely as possible or have a thick algae mat. Having a group of floating plants in the corner of the aquarium will promote rearing outside of the breeding tank. Every 60-70 days the female will give birth to 10-60 young that are approximately one-half inch long.

The Mexican Sailfin Molly is omnivorous and requires both meaty foods as well as algae. Provide this fish with an algae-based flake food, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp.

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The Balloon Molly

Balloon MollyThe Balloon Molly is a hybrid variation of Poecilia latipinna, the Sailfin Molly. The Sailfin Molly, P. latipinna, can be distinguished from the Mexican Sailfin, P. velifera by the number of dorsal rays. The Mexican Salfin has 18-19, and the Sailfin Molly has 14. The Balloon Molly has an arched back and a rounded, large belly. Color varieties include a combination of black, yellow, and white. This fish also has a large, lyre-shaped caudal fin and an impressive dorsal fin.

Mollies have the ability to adapt to a variety of salt levels in the aquarium. With a gradual acclimation, this fish may be maintained in either a freshwater or saltwater aquarium. In the freshwater aquarium, a teaspoon of aquarium salt per gallon is recommended for optimum health. The Balloon Molly requires a tank of at least 30 gallons with plenty of strong plants such as Java fern, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, and Anubias. It requires a good filtration system because of its hearty appetite and resulting waste products. The Balloon Molly is well suited for the community tank because of its peaceful nature, and is compatible with other peaceful, large fish that can withstand similar water conditions. It may pursue its young and the young of other fish.

The pointed anal fin and much larger dorsal fin on the male, and the rounded anal fin and pregnancy spot on the female differentiate the two. The Balloon Molly is a livebearer that requires a spawning box in a 25 gallon, or larger, breeding tank. The aquarium should be planted as densely as possible or have a thick algae mat. Having a group of floating plants in the corner of the aquarium will promote rearing outside of the breeding tank. Every 60-70 days the female will give birth to 10-60 young that are approximately one-half inch long.

The Balloon Molly is omnivorous and requires both meaty foods as well as algae. Provide this fish with an algae-based flake food, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp.

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The Blue Damsel Molly

Blue Damsel MollyThe Blue Damselfish, also known as the Blue Devil Damselfish, is the Molly of saltwater aquariums. It is a very colorful, hardy, and active fish. The female is all blue; the male has an orange tail, and is known by the common name of Orangetail Blue Damselfish. In the wild, Blue Damselfish are found throughout reefs, usually busy defending a small territory. The Blue Damselfish has the ability to hide in a hole or crevice and darken to an almost black color. This usually happens when it is threatened. After the perceived threat is gone, it will turn electric blue in a matter of seconds.

The Blue Damselfish is somewhat aggressive, so its housing should be able to easily accommodate multiple specimens. It is a good fish for beginners, and makes an ideal companion fish for a saltwater tank of over 100 liters (30 gallons), and as a great companion for reefs and invertebrates. As the fish matures it may become aggressive, causing problems with the selection of other species to be added to the aquarium. If keeping with other damselfish, provide multiple hiding places to break up territories and decrease aggression.

The Blue Damselfish diet should consist of flaked and frozen foods, and herbivore preparations.

The Blue Damselfish is probably the best selling marine fish in the United States. Its hardiness and small size make it the most common fish used for cycling a saltwater tank.

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